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Re Great website!
Thanks for your nice comment. Hope get 110 out of 100 for the school project.

Stephen (Eating China)
17 January 2014

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re: XI Fan - using brown rice
Hi Bruce, Thanks for the feedback. Brown rice normally takes longer no matter how you cook it because of the husk, or harder bits that are normally milled off to make white rice. Personally I don't like brown rice with Chinese food as it doesn't have the usual fluffiness, but I do sometimes cook a half brown, half white, which doesn't seem to need extra cooking time.

Stephen (Eating China)
17 January 2014

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re: XI Fan - using brown rice
IT seemed to take longer to cook using the only rice we already had - brown rice. I also believe I may need to cook it longer with perhaps more water to get brown rice to work better. Not a disaster, just not the Xi Fan I remember in Taiwan. Used to have it at least every other morning. But it was made with white rice.

Bruce Cascketta
17 January 2014
caskman46@gmail.com

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Great website!
This site is so awesome for school projects. I am doing a middle ages project on ancient Chinese and this really helped. Thank you for having such an informative site.

Sydney
17 January 2014
sydneyburns107@gmail.com

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re: Spring Onion Flatbread
Hi Jim, Sorry the recipe is unclear. Your feedback will help me improve it, though the video might be a while coming! Try these modified steps 9 to11. 9. With your hands, roll dough from one side to the other (wrapping the spring onions) into a strand. 10. With the dough strand on a bench, curl it from end to end, into a spiral. Tuck tail end on top of spiral. 11. With a rolling pin, roll spiral into a disc about the size of a dinner plate. Hope that helps and you get a good result.

Stephen (Eating China)
10 January 2014

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re: Spring Onion Flatbread
A video would help me visualize steps 10 and 11. It seems to be curled into a cone shape and then rolled into a circular disk but that seems unlikely.

Jim
09 January 2014
jim@featherstudio.com

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re:
Thanks for sharing this post. It's really interesting.

báu
12 September 2013
baubau@horizon-vietnam.com

http://www.horizon-vietnamvoyage.com/

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re:
thanks for this article, it's so interisting !

tran
11 September 2013
tcn399@gmail.com

http://codientamduong.com/

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re:
The dressing is so bland because of the water! Try making this WITHOUT the water.

Amy
08 September 2013

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re:
Hello, Neat post. There's a problem together with your website in internet explorer, might check this? IE nonetheless is the market chief and a huge section of other people will omit your magnificent writing because of this problem.

Kevin
06 September 2013
long.marketing@outlook.com

http://webdesignvalley.com/houston-web-design

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thank's
I like this food, I want to try it at home It's special food

supri
23 August 2013
salesa027@gmail.com

http://kuerasa.blogspot.com/

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re: Taiwan Gumboa chicken
Trying to explain to someone in OZ how t make taiwan style, not that american crap, str, you got any links ?uggling to find a simple recipe

Steve Fenton
25 May 2013

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History of China
I suggest using this link " http://www.unifiniti.com/2012/06/history-of-china.html " for your links page.

John Lin
25 May 2013

http://www.unifiniti.com/2012/06/history-of-china.html

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Liuzhou Laowai
Hello. I am an educated engendered type. I am very fit for a smoker. My family emigrated here from China. My great grandfather started an inner city dog catching service during the war. I am highly political, not afraid of demonstration.

Liuzhou Laowai
13 April 2013
Jaappell@gmail.com

http://i635.photobucket.com/albums/uu78/LiuzhouLaowai/kong-yansong.jpg

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re: Chafing Dish Tofu
Not a bad idea. Cheers.

stephen (eating china)
27 March 2013

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re: Chafing Dish Tofu
Chafing Dish Tofu doesn't exactly roll off the tongue... maybe this dish needs a name change? --------------------------------- I've seen "Easy Chicken Everywhere!" (have you?)

Royette
25 March 2013

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re: ants climbing a tree recipe
Thanks for the feedback. I will have to try it that way.

stephen (eating china)
11 March 2013

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re: ants climbing a tree recipe
Soaking the noodles in hot water for that long made them mushy. I think they only need 2 minutes in hot water. Then rinse them with cold water, cut them up into more manageable lengths and separate them a little (if you like), and put them into the hot meat mixture in the wok to cook fully.

NYC polyglot
11 March 2013

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re: Recipe for Dofu nao
Hi Derek, Sorry I don't have a recipe. Not quite sure what you mean by the 'sauce.' Maybe this link will help: http://en.christinesrecipes.com/2008/06/tofu-fa-recipe-chinese-dessert.html

Stephen (eating china)
01 March 2013

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didn't post correctly
recipe for doufu nao, Thanks, D

Derek
24 February 2013
dgkemp1@gmail.com

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recipe for dufu no
I am looking for a recipe for dufu no, mainly the sauce. I have found a few recipes for the soft tofu,no luck finding the sauce. hope you can help. Thanks, D

Derek
24 February 2013
dgkemp1@gmail,com

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re: Looks Delicious
I will defenitely try this recipe.

Jan
19 February 2013
theglutenfree1@gmail.com

http://www.theglutenfree.com

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re: scallion flatbread recipe
Hi Jackja, Sorry you have had trouble printing the recipe. I don't have a separate print page. Easiest thing to do is just select and copy text into another program such as Word and print.

Stephen (eating china)
05 February 2013

http://www.eatingchina.com

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re: scallion flatbread recipe
I've been looking for this recipe for a long, long time and can't wait to try it. However, I couldn't get page two to print, only the banners on the side appeared. I nearly ran out of paper trying. Do you have a "printer friendly" version. I'll be sure to comment as soon as I've tried the recipe

Jackja
31 January 2013
jackemcguire@verizon.net

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re: Recipes and Marinades
Hello- Looking for recipes... I just moved from the country to the city and want to try something different. I notice quite a few stray cats. Good marinade recipes would be helpful. Thanks!

Susan C.
19 January 2013
onewiththeearth@yahoo.com

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=123450471002828

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re: red beef noodle soup
Hi Deb, Dinner for 40 people! You can open a restaurant next. In answer to your questions: 1. The English name for the sauce is quite variable, so I would guess 'Chili bean sauce' is what you want. The key ingredient is fermented beans, either soy or fava. Here is the Chinese name just to be sure: 辣豆瓣醬 làdòubànjiàng. There is another version of the sauce without chillies. I couldn't recommend a brand as what I have here (in Taiwan) is likely different to what you have available. You will be fine with most brands. 2. Chilli used in Taiwan for most things including this dish is a cayenne pepper, and it is not particularly hot, so cut down if you are using hotter varieties.

Stephen (eating china)
18 January 2013

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red beef noodle soup
Last Spring Festival I made the beef soup for 40 Chinese guests, with the help from a Chinese friend. She guided me through it, from shopping for the ingredients to actually cooking. Everyone loved it! This year she is gone, so I need some help. 1) is there a recommended brand for the hot bean sauce? The Chinese grocery only had Chili bean sauce. Same thing? And it asks for chili peppers... Does that mean the small green Thai peppers? The little red peppers? I am afraid of making it too hot.

Deb
13 January 2013
Debedmo55@gmail.com

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Textile Imports
I like your site, I really do. And I respect your traditions. -BUT- I cannot get used to chopsticks. I can play it on the piano, but if I were in the woods starving, I'd catch more food with a fork. I started looking at your recipes. They looked tasty. Then I looked at my cats and broke down in tears. Still, I wish you the best of luck.

Kim Ling Hzu
30 December 2012

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=123450471002828

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re: Steamed Fish
Thanks for your comment, hope you try more of my recipes.

stephen (eating china)
30 December 2012

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re: Steamed Fish
I've been looking for a simple recipe for this dish for awhile now, thank you! Love the recipes on here, I enjoy Chinese cuisine but I live in Northern Canada so I don't get to eat it unless I make it myself. Thanks for sharing!

CalicoCat
30 December 2012

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Ants Climb a Tree
YUM!! I want more mung bean noodle recipes

Paula
25 November 2012
pm.vonderheide@gmail.com

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hi
NICE BLOG

GUI Testing
23 October 2012
ajayjha1807@gmailcom

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re: Cable Capers 2
This is a very nice blog that I will definitively come back to more times this year! Thanks for informative post.

Cable Capers 2
08 October 2012
uahmed59@gmail.com

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Western China
Hey Stephen, Could you give a little more info about the Liang fen, pungent salad mix. what kind of salads were they, Noodle? And what made them pungent a vinegar or is it more like stinky tofu? Also What would you call the main dish (outside of lamb kebab) of western china, (pilaf?) I have found a western Chinese restaurant in a city I will be visiting soon, kind would like a suggestion of what to look for to get an idea of the taste and flavors. 90% Cantonese and Fujian with Sichuan rounding out the final 10% for Chinese restaurants I have been to, Oyea 1 Taiwanese place, hence the reference to stinky tofu ;) Thanks For keeping Eating China going Its Great !! Phil

Phil
06 August 2012

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dou jin
Yeh, guess it looks like I shall have to use some trial and error (or find someone who knows how to do it!). :)

Jessica
22 July 2012
chook_is_cool@hotmail.com

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re:
I couldn't find hot bean paste, so I bought the closest thing I could find. It takes pretty good, but I think I put too much soy sauce in it.

Allison
22 July 2012

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re: Recipe for ը(ban doujin).
Hi Jessica. I thought it might be in Fuchsia Dunlop's Land of Plenty Sichuan cookbook but it is not. Sorry, can't help you. If I am ever in Sichuan again I will look out for it. Sounds good.

Stephen (Eating China)
14 July 2012

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Recipe for 拌豆筋(ban doujin).
Hi!!! Am on the lookout for a recipe on how to make ban dou jin. It is a popular snack in Sichuan. It's made from dried rolled "dou pi" (this is my guess) and I guess when prepared is soaked or cooked in water, cut into pieces and served with a cold or warm "ban" sauce i.e. garlic, vinegar, soy sauce, shallots, sugar etc.. I have a general idea of how it might be made, but am hoping someone can help me out with the correct way of preparing it.. Thanks! Jess :)

Jessica
13 July 2012
jessieclaire03@hotmail.com

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re: Zongzi
Hi Bam, It is a great recipe. Big job. Scale up, get some help and make as many as you like. They freeze well.

Stephen (Eating China)
27 June 2012

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Zongzi
Great zongzi recipe! Very clear directions! I am sending some viewers of my website to yours to try your yummy recipe. We enjoyed some delicious zongzi from the dragon boat festival this week. All I had to do was steam them but was interested on this very detailed process of making them from scratch. Take care, BAM

Bamskitchen
26 June 2012

http://bamskitchen.com

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re: laptop
haha Chinese eat everything and i MEAN everything, don't call them crazy their just being chinessse.. love their Peking duck,ummmmm makes me hungry everytime...

penny auctions
30 May 2012
jjeffries222@gmail.com

http://bidcandy.com

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re: The China Food Trail
That is a good question Phil, and I MIGHT be able to better answer it when I learn more. Yes, sure enough the veggies you mentioned as examples all seem common enough, especially tomato. In fact before I even arrived in Xinjiang a local bloke told me, "If it hasn't got tomato in it, it might not be a Xinjiang dish." An exaggeration for sure, but tomato is more common than other parts of China that I have visited. I suppose it worth remembering the amount of foreign traffic that flowed through Xinjiang from both the west and east sides, and the interflowing influences that has brought. The Silk Road extended from Japan right through China then splitting off in Xinjiang to go southwest, west, and northwest. Only Xinjiang contains all three. The southern route, which I have just travelled, is all well-made two lane highway, and the railways have been extended in recent years: there is a brand new line connecting Khotan to Kashgar. Towns along the way ate much more modern and bigger, than I (and perhaps others?) imagined. Even out here things are changing quite quickly.

Stephen (Eating China)
18 May 2012

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re: The China Food Trail
Hey Stephen , Out of curiosity whats infiltration of western vegetable in the indigenous cuisine of western china IE: tomatoes, corn and potatoes? I notice it seemed some of your food pics had tomatoes in them? Has the western veg's. become common place even in western deserts of china? I have noticed since the early 80s more and more eastern Chinese recipes seem to have stir-frys and what not of them and was wondering if they have infected the great western deserts there?

Phil
18 May 2012

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re: Book: Chinese Cuisine 101
Thanks for the comments Phil. Will post more info and food photos when I can. Problem is the ongoing battle with internet connections. Posting from phone has its limitations. cheers.

stephen (Eating China)
17 May 2012

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re: Book: Chinese Cuisine 101
Love the Chinese 101 cook book; picked it up a week ago, Thanks for profiling it I would have never known about it otherwise. Your trip has been a very interesting read so far. Some food pics of your more mundane meals while in route to your main destinations would be appreciated, if the mood strikes you. Find it interesting to see what other cultures and people's in other countries sack on, on the cheep.

Phil
16 May 2012

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re: Bizarre Foods
Hi, It moved from the original address and I don't know the new one.

Stephen (Eating China)
12 May 2012

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re: Bizarre Foods
Where is the Black Gee restaurant located? I am really interested in the chicken testicle soup.

Iokua
11 May 2012

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re: ܯ Chinese pronunciation of kumquat
Hi Evan. Your'e right, but here in Taiwan everyone pronounces kumquat () as jin ji. I guess because it uses N, 'lucky.' In any case, I should have both versions on my website. Cheers.

Stephen (eating china)
03 April 2012

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re: 金桔茶
Should be pronounced jin ju cha, as in 桔子juzi or tangerine

Evan
01 April 2012

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re: eating dogs
China's cultural policy seems to be- Eat any animal available, treat your own citizens like animals, and treat the environment like a second class citizen. No wonder Asians are seen as animals intent on killing and eating the last of an endangered species as something to improve their sexual self esteem. As if they hav'nt procreated too much already.....

Haywood J. Blome
20 March 2012
lascow11@yahoo.com

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re: some Taipei restaurants.
the abundance choices of food in Taipei is a boon for foodies.

Low.
13 March 2012
low.b.leong@gmail.com

http://foodbin.blogspot.com

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re: Taiwanese Beef Noodle Soup Recipe
Good one. Thanks Gary.

Stephen (eating china)
07 February 2012

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re: Taiwanese Beef Noodle Soup Recipe
Chef Hou's recipe is here: http://goo.gl/fm6Ob

Gary Soup
06 February 2012
gary@garysoup.com

http://garysoup.com

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re: Plain White Rice
Rice turned out perfect! I was tempted to check on it but I didn't. Adhear to the instructions and it should turn out just as good for you.

Chris
19 January 2012

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re: rice etc.
Thanks for your advice and corrections. re rice I don't doubt the risk, and that people have been made sick by Bacillus cereus, but not all credible sources tally with the UK national health service on keeping rice no longer than a day. This one says nothing about how long you should keep rice: http://foodsafety.unl.edu/pathogens/bacillus.html This one says three days: http://www.abc.net.au/health/talkinghealth/factbuster/stories/2009/01/27/2475255.htm While it is always wise to err on the side of caution, myself and plenty of others (dare I say 'most people'), have never had a problem by applying the standard procedure of refrigerating rice (or any cooked food) before it cools, and thoroughly reheating before eating again. Of course, most foods are better fresher, and not just for food safety reasons. The only way to completely avoid risk of food borne pathogens is not to eat or drink, and that is no way to live. re: Cassia and Guilin All I can say is, oops. re: Lactose intolerance. I probably agree with you. My experience in Taiwan is similiar. Though how much is fact (if any) and how much is myth, is the question. I had always meant to follow up on that one but never got around to it. Until I do, I'll remove that parroted 'fact' altogether.

stephen (eating china)
16 January 2012

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re: Rice
Sorry to make another negative comment, but your information about rice is not only inaccurate but potentially dangerous. First you say in in your cooking tips article that "Chinese families cook enough rice to last for several days." Really? In the 18 years I've been in China, I've never met any family who doesn't cook rice freshly at least once a day. Usually twice. Then you say that "Rice keeps well in an airtight container in the fridge for a week or more". Astonishing. Most health authorities recommend that cooked rice be chilled and refrigerated as quickly as possible and then stored for no more than one day. The UK national health service, for example, say: Tips on serving rice safely Ideally, serve rice as soon as it has been cooked. If that isn't possible, cool the rice as quickly as possible (ideally within one hour). Keep rice in the fridge for no more than one day until reheating. When you reheat any rice, always check that the dish is steaming hot all the way through. Do not reheat rice more than once. Mr. Google will provide you with many more similar sources of advice. Bacillus cereus is not fun! Check it out.

Liuzhou Laowai
15 January 2012

http://www.liuzhou.co.uk/blog

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re: Cassia and Guilin
I'm sorry, but the Gui in Guilin does not refer to cassia bark. It refers to osmanthus flowers (桂花), the city's symbol.

Liuzhou Laowai
15 January 2012

http://www.liuzhou.co.uk/blog

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re: Email address
It is customary to not publish the email addresses of people who comment. Can you please remove mine immediately. I don't need any more spam, thank you.

Liuzhou Laowai
15 January 2012

http://www.liuzhou.co.uk/blog

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re: Lactose intolerance.
So, that will be why every Chinese supermarket has shelf after shelf of milk products, then. Milk powders, yoghurt etc. The whole Chinese lactose intolerance thing is a myth. Many people don't like it. Many others do. That's all.

Liuzhou Laowai
15 January 2012

http://www.liuzhou.co.uk/blog

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re: Taiwan-style Cold Noodles
Don't know about tamarind. It is not something I usually associate with Taiwan food, though I think I have seen it growing here Taiwan. I also suspect that the dressing for this dish is a fairly recent invention, hence the peanut butter, perhaps.

stephen (eating china)
13 January 2012

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re: Taiwan-style Cold Noodles
Instead of peanut butter, wouldn't the typical be tamarind? I'm not familiar with how much the Taiwanese use more India-based ingredients.

Natty
13 January 2012
gothicarmy18@gmail.com

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re: thats cool
wonder where they found the burial site

ben
29 December 2011

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re: Radish Cake recipe
Hello Ellie, I should make this clearer in the recipe. I use an electric rice cooker (basic type with water in the outer pan). If you don't have one, you need some kind of bain-marie/double boiler arrangement: basically, steam your pan of radish mixture inside a larger covered container with water.

stephen (eating china)
11 December 2011

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Radish Cake recipe
Hi, Id like to try the radish cake recipe but i don't understand how you do the steaming part. Do you need a special steamer? Or can you do it in the oven or on the hob? Thank you

Ellie
10 December 2011
eleanor.dunn@hotmail.co.uk

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re: More f-ing great Taiwanese recipes
F-ing nice comment. Ta Phil.

stephen (eating china)
09 December 2011

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re:
"More f-ing great Taiwanese recipes here." that made me laugh, Great websight!!!!

Phil
09 December 2011
tecatefil@hotmail.com

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re: Hot & Sour Soup
Thanks for your comment Hyacinthe. The old 'authentic cuisine' issue. Certainly there is a market for 'authentic' Chinese cuisine. It would be better if there was an easy way to tell if a restaurant sold authentic food or Americanised Chinese food … On the other hand, food, like anything else tends to change when it travels, and tailoring your product to the local market is probably taught in any Marketing 101 class. Chinese food has a long tradition in America, and when those first gold diggers introduced it they were probably cooking only for themselves and their compatriots. I suspect even what they cooked back then for themselves was already at variance with what they would cook back home because they lacked certain ingredients, for example. In any case, those Chinese did not come to America as ambassadors of Chinese food, they came to make money, and cooking and selling Chinese food (or Western food, as many of them did), turned out to be a way many of them did that. A good book that covers that history is China to Chinatown

Stephen (eating china)
20 November 2011

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re: Hot & Sour Soup
I grew up in Asia and have been in the US since the early 70's. What I don't understand is why the Chinese always open restaurants that serve "American" Chinese foods on their menu. When I ask the reply I always receive is that "we dont like traditional Chinese foods". I wonder if they are just lazy or think we are just ignorant about what REAL Chinese food is. My reply to them is to T-E-A-C-H us what REAL Chinese food is!!!! I think they would be very surprised to find that many "Americans" dont know what it is because the Chinese DONT teach us!! Some ppl will love it and others wont. BUT.. most will. I also want to thank Eating China for posting many traditional dishes. YUM YUM... "Have you eaten today?"

Hyacinthe
20 November 2011
HyacintheBouquet@earthlink.net

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re:Recently tried stinky dofu
Hello Kimi. Good story. The name of the dish does not really do itself any favours in the advertising stakes (but guess that depends on who you are), but it is honest. It does stink, at least when it is being cooked. Glad you liked it.

stephen (eating china)
04 November 2011

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re:
it is very helpful...i tried it and it comes as it was and very delicious....i remembered those days in tainan,,,,thank you

nikka reyes
28 October 2011
nikkareyes44@yahoo.com

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re: YUM
I love pork belly and steamed buns. Texturally, there is something so right about this dish - not to mention the divine flavor. Thanks for sharing.

blondebomber
24 October 2011
robin@whitemedia.com

http://www.squidoo.com/best-places-to-eat-in-new-york

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re: Taiwan-Style Cold Noodles
Thanks for the feedback Alex. It would not hurt to loose a bit of soy or vinegar but for me, it is the pungency that I like about the sauce. And you can use it as a dressing on salads too.

stephen (eating china)
03 October 2011

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re: Taiwan-Style Cold Noodles
Tried the recipe, but the sauce seems a bit thin compared to most versions of the dish I've had. Tastes good although I would add a little less soy sauce cause it's so overpowering.

Alex
02 October 2011

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re: douban jiang
Hello Christine, This probably won't clarify things much but … douban jiang, is a very common sauce found all over China. The literal translation would be 'bean fragment sauce.' In Chinese an unspecified dou/bean typically refers to soybean, such is that bean's importance in Chinese cuisine. In fact soybeans normally are the basis of the sauce. However, apparently, in Sichuan (where Ants supposedly originated), douban jiang is used heavily and it made is from broad beans. As you said, the Lee Kum Kee version uses both kinds of beans. In Taiwan, there are plenty of broad beans but the sauce is made from soybeans, and that is what is usually used in Ants. My recipe uses the hot version which in Chinese is la douban jiang. There are so many regional variations in China, that and various ways of rendering Chinese into English … well, it is still confusing to me too. BTW, douban jiang is also called brown bean sauce sometimes, Martin Yan, for example.

Stephen (eating china)
30 September 2011

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RE: Ants Climbing Trees
Dear Stephen Thank you for your reply. But I don't think you are right. I've been doing a bit of research since I posted my comment and found that there are various hot bean sauces that are appropriate for different dishes and that come under different names in English. For our Ants Climbing Trees, you need 'douban jiang', which Lee Kum Kee calls 'chili bean sauce' and is chiefly fermented broad bean paste, with the addition of salted chili and fermented soybean paste. This is not to be confused with (for one example) 'ma po' sauce, which Lee Kum Kee sells as 'spicy bean sauce' and is mainly fermented soybean paste with the addition of Szechwan peppercorns. I have in fact been using Ma Po sauce for Ants Climbing Trees for years, thinking that 'spicy' and 'chili' were interchangeable names. But a recent conversation with my Chinese grocery store owner revealed that this is only for cooking tofu and so I was getting it all wrong. He was disgusted with me. I daresay this is still much left to learn. BTW, why can't I see the comments on the website? Do you know? Thanks

Christine
30 September 2011

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re: Ants Climbing Trees
Sorry for the confusion. 'Rice noodle dish' is a mistake. The noodles are mung bean. As for the 'hot soy bean paste,' it does come under a confusing variety of names and likely all the ones you mention are the same thing. Bean paste/sauce will have whole or ground fermented soybeans, not to be confused with black beans. Hot version simple has added chilli sauce.

stephen (eating china)
26 September 2011

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re: Ants Climbing Trees
Next to the title it says 'rice noodle dish', but a couple of sentences later, 'mung bean noodles'. Also, I would like to know exactly what 'hot soy bean paste' is as there are severl pastes and sauces in jars under titles like 'spicy bean sauce', 'hot bean paste', 'chili bean paste', etc. Which one?

Christine
26 September 2011
cchampion@hct.ac.ae

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re: No spices
You must not know much about Cantonese cuisine. Many dishes are without spices, so it's anything but 'rare' that you encounter a dish in Cantonese cuisine that has no spices. Cantonese believe in the freshness of ingredients. Spices are only there to mask or supplement the ingredients. If your chicken is fresh (or fish or pork for that matter), there is no need to add any spices. Baiqieji or Baizhanji is best served with a ginger/scallion sauce. Here's one of the more simple, no-frills recipe: http://www.salon.com/food/francis_lam/2010/06/18/ginger_scallion_sauce_recipe

I, I, I was born in Hong Kong
16 September 2011

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re:
Doubting in Chinese cruelty? Watch this: https://www.ptroa.co.il/petition/index.php Maybe not a donkey, but still a good example to satisfy your need of proofs

chinesetastes
15 September 2011

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re:
While i think you are completely right in your precise execution of a science experiment to prove this saying incorrect, i think the point you have missed is the fact that people are idiots, and sometimes say things that aren't perfectly, dead-on right. I think what the saying is trying to capture, is that, like most 'meats'(or anything for that matter) tofu will taste like whatever you cook it in...

Agedashi-dofu
05 September 2011

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re: Eating china
I never cooked in my mothers kitchen growing up. Cooking Chinese food, to be honest, feels a lot less natural than making a Thai coconut curry. Did I feel an ethnic rekindling with this strange, foreign cuisine with its exotic ingredients like dark soy sauce?

how to cook lamb
01 September 2011
lambcookmail@gmail.com

http://www.howtocooklamb.info

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re: Taiwanese Cold Noodle Recipe
Very good. This tastes exactly like my favorite restaurant's cold noodle. I was scared to put in the exact amount of soy sauce and vinegar so I put in a little less than that but everything else I followed the directions exactly as stated.

Yvonne
01 September 2011

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re: Kumquat Tea
This recipe sounds easy enough. Thanks for sharing it! Next time I see fresh kumquat at the farmer's market, I'll give this recipe a try. Have you ever tried a chilled Hawthorn Berry Honey Tea? It is another simple drink I'd like to make during the hot summer months. A good alternative to regular iced tea. =)

Sharon Lee
28 August 2011

http://www.ChineseSoupPot.com

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re:
Chinese cuisine is very respected and highly appreciated. China has a lot of nice ingredients they can cook too.

Plumbing
25 July 2011
cheoulkenno@yahoo.com

http://www.bes.co.uk

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make your meal into a soup
Heres a tip to control the amounts of food you eat and more importantly Hunger Pangs. The British Territorial army recruits were entrusted for this controlled experiment. The recruits were Devided into two teams The Red Team and The Yellow Team . The two teams were given the same amounts of food and the same amount calories, consisting of Chicken, Rice and Vegetables and a glass of water each . The yellow team ate their food and drank the water with it. The Red Team mixed the water with the food and made a soup out of it . Immediately after the meal. Both teams had their stomaches scanned and both were full .. Two hours after the same Physical exercises were performed by the Yellow and Red teams, the teams stomachs were scanned again respectively . The Red Team showed it had more food left in their stomachs after the exercises than the Yellow team. In fact the yellow teams stomachs were sending message to the brain for more food because as the stomach starts shrinks it notifies the brain using the hormone Ghrelin to fill the stomach up. So there you have it, don't drink water Separately with your meals, as it fills the stomach quicker and also dissipates quicker causing the stomach to shrink more quickly. http://www.vitaminarcade.com/weight-loss-no-diet/weight-loss-tips.

Gordon
21 July 2011
gordytuf@msn.com

http://www.vitaminarcade.com/

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re: Invitation to showcase recipes on LiveliGood.org
Our site,Liveligood.Org, is dedicated to helping people lead healthy lives. As a part of the site, we offer resources for people to learn about healthy recipes around the world. We are inviting chefs around the world to showcase some of their best and healthiest recipes. I want to invite you to present some of your recipes on Liveligood.Org. Besides posting your recipes, you can also add one page of background information about yourself. This will allow people to get to know you, and add to your visibility in the internet. Please let me know if this is something you will be interested in, and I will send you further details about the logistics. Warm regards, Mohan Venkataramana. Seattle, WA (425) 883-0664

Mohan Venkataramana
19 July 2011
info@liveligood.org

http://www.liveligood.org

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Chinese Radish Cake
Different cultures really do surprise you. I haven't tried a radish cake yet as we usually use radish for salads. But it's quite interesting to know how a radish cake taste like. The post even say of a fried version of the white radish cake. I hope I can get a sample to taste in a Chinatown near our place.

Brochure Printing
16 July 2011
zyril.g@uprinting.com

http://www.brochuresprintingonline.com/

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re:
I cooked this for a CHinese gathering although I am not Chinese or Asian. It was really good and flavorful. Thank you for your many suggestions and advice regarding Chinese culture.

Agnes
15 July 2011
aheartconnection@yahoo.com

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re: Kumquat tea
Glad you like it. Often the simplest things are the best. Different varieties of kumquats have different levels of sweetness ranging from very sour to quite sweet. Kumquat: The Dwarf Orange of China

stephen (eating china)
05 July 2011

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re: Kumquat tea
This recipe is simple and absolutely wonderful! The tea is so tasty and I didn't even need any sweeteners. I kept using up my cumquats too quickly and having to buy more!

Hyacinth Goot
04 July 2011
hyacinth007@hotmail.com

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re:
You've been busy.

Gary King
02 July 2011

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re: Radish Cake
Thanks Angeline, it is delicious. Have another recipe coming soon.

stephen (eating china)
28 June 2011

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re: Radish Cake
Love radish cake and yours looks delectable.

Angeline
28 June 2011

http://poemsversesmore.com/http://

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re: Foood
I think you are talking about my Fish Fry with Peanuts recipe? (http://www.eatingchina.com/recipes/fishfry-peanuts.htm) If so, the fish are called silver-stripe round herring, but other small fish are used too. Cheers

stephen (eating china)
24 June 2011

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Fooooood
This mean looks absolutely wonderful! Thank you so much for the recipe. I just have a quick question. What kind of fish is that? They look like sardines. Thanks again. -Rob Recipe Club

Rob
20 June 2011
rob.leonard.tx@gmail.com

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re: Quick question again
I see have made a typo in post blow. I suggested to Rob that any kind of 'mice' can be used in Ants Climbing Trees. I meant to type 'mince.' Still, I suppose any kind of mice would be okay, as long it is minced up well. For quantity you would probably need to use two mice or one decent-sized rat.

stephen (eating china)
11 June 2011

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re: Quick question
Rob, first thanks for your earlier comment. Second, yeah, any kind of mice will work fine. It is a simple dish. Hope your wife likes it. Happy anniversary. Cheers.

stephen (eating china)
08 June 2011

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Quick Question
I have a quick question. Any other meat work other than minced pork? Thanks again, Rob Recipe Contests

Rob Leonard
07 June 2011
rob.leonard.tx@gmail.com

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Wonderfully Done!
My wife loves asian food. I have been looking around for a recipe I can prepare for our 13th aniversary. This looks to be the winner. I love the visual creativeness with the "ants." Thanks again for the great recipe! - A man trying to impress his wife (aka Rob)

Recipe Contests
07 June 2011

http://www.justapinch.com/kitchen/contests

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re: Recipes
Thanks for saying that Mark. I will keep posting. Working on a luo bo gao (radish cake) recipe now. I'm sure you'll remember that one.

stephen (eating china)
07 June 2011

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Recipes
I love the recipes you have posted here. Its hard to find Taiwanese recipes anywhere. Having lived in Taiwan for two years these recipes bring back lots of memories. Please post more interesting recipes.

Mark Lyn
07 June 2011
mlassoc@yahoo.com

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re; Zhongzi
Hello Jennifer. That's great. Making zongzi is a serious undertaking; I won't do it without a helper or two. So how long did you end up steaming them for?

stephen (eating china)
06 June 2011

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re; Zhongzi
These made very authentic tasting Taiwanese Zhongzi, and my friends were really impressed that I made them from scratch (it sounds like no-one my generation does this). I found they needed a longer steaming time to get properly soft.

Jennifer
06 June 2011

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re: "The vegetarian egg rolls were meaningless K"
Stephen, what you wrote sounds reasonable. Indeed, over-cooked food is not good. The restaurant the author mentions may be really bad, but I hope the author can focus more on the "combination" problems (such as making cold soup with too much oil, which makes the soup taste disgusting, or wrapping chicken in near-raw thick watery dough, which even affects the chewing) instead of using a single adjective for each part since the words he chose, when standing alone, can mean good things.

Kuei-Ti Lu
26 May 2011
ktravelfor@gmail.com

http://www.culturezest.org/home/users/detail?UserHexID=2C585A58-2C78-4DF9-97F9-90DEFAE9A51C

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re: "The vegetarian egg rolls were meaningless
You certainly read more into that story than I did. The writer does not seem to dislike Chinese food, he just dislikes this restaurant, and thinks these dishes – which sound like they would be very common to US Chinese restaurants – are badly done. "… the shrimp were over-cooked, the fried rice tasted as if it were days old and warmed up." I too have eaten over-cooked shrimp and desiccated fried rice. Acceptable in home cooking, perhaps, but I don't think so when you are eating out.

stephen (eating china)
24 May 2011

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re: "The vegetarian egg rolls were meaningless K"
I seem to realize your feeling toward this quote. I do not usually criticize someone or something, but I would describe the author of this quote, as politely as I can, as naive and lacking cultural understanding. It sounds like that he does not even understand the variety of food. The first sentence seems, which is the worst among the quote, to imply his personal ignorance of vegetarians (I am not a vegetarian, if anyone wants to poke me with this). Besides, the vegetarian egg rolls have their unique taste just as the other egg rolls do. I wonder what his opinion about pineapple sweet egg rolls is. The second one incited my question: "Why cannot the dough be near-raw?" In some cuisines, especially in some Asian, African, and South American cuisines, the dough is even often exactly raw, but the foods are still tasty. The third one's logic is as unreasonable as the second one's: "Why cannot the soup be cold?" In fact, the famous bubble tea is made as soup (not drinks) in some regions - and ice is even sometimes added. The last twos, since I did not eat in that restaurant, it is better for me not to comment. Although the author can say the restaurant is not good, his reasons are just unfair. I hope he can taste more foods around the world and learn his narrow view at this time.

Kuei-Ti Lu
24 May 2011
ktravelfor@gmail.com

http://www.culturezest.org/home/users/detail?UserHexID=2C585A58-2C78-4DF9-97F9-90DEFAE9A51C

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re: pork bun delight
Truly superb was in there about ten days ago, great after riding in Daken

steve
23 May 2011

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re: Bunny sweat
IT still smells of fresh rabbit mate

Steve
23 May 2011

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This is one of the best Chinese cooking blogs
No it isn't about adding corn starch to everything. No it isn't about stir-fry everything under the sun. No it isn't about kung-pao and general tsao being the only way to prepare chicken! (Steamed chicken please!) These are western misconceptions.

Ting Ting
22 May 2011

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re: Working donkey in China
Hi, just have photos of radishes drying. Will post soon.

stephen (eating china)
19 May 2011

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re: Working donkey in China
It is nice to see a picture of a donkey since I have never seen a real donkey. You mentioned you were searching for a photo of a radish. Will there be a post related to it? In fact, it is one of my favorite.

Kuei-Ti Lu
17 May 2011
ktravelfor@gmail.com

http://www.culturezest.org/home/users/detail?UserHexID=2C585A58-2C78-4DF9-97F9-90DEFAE9A51C

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re: For a simple, filling, and spicy dish try ants
This is one of my favorites as well. It is also delicious when added Doubanjiang. Since it is easy to make, however, I sometimes feel tired of it if having too much in one meal. For your last reply, I agree with that the monkeys and squirrels are obvious examples. I even feel that the monkeys are just too many.

Kuei-Ti Lu
07 May 2011
ktravelfor@gmail.com

http://www.culturezest.org/home/users/detail?UserHexID=2C585A58-2C78-4DF9-97F9-90DEFAE9A51C

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re: Yikes! There is a giant yellow rabbit on the road
Yeah I am sure loss of habit and hunting is the main reason for pressure on many wild animals in Taiwan. I think in the last few years though things have improved in some ways. Around outskirts of Taichung, and in the low mountains I see more animals or evidence of their presence than 10 years ago. Monkeys and squirrels are the most obvious. There are more birds now, even in the cities. Some protection, and the recent greening of our cities has really helped.

Stephen (eating china)
03 May 2011

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re: Yikes! There is a giant yellow rabbit on the road
Lepus sinensis formosus once lived mainly on the low places in Taiwan, but because people have been destroying their habitat for development, they moved into the mountains. Maybe because of the unsuitable habitat, they can not breed well.

Kuei-Ti Lu
01 May 2011
ktravelfor@gmail.com

http://www.culturezest.org/home/users/detail?UserHexID=2C585A58-2C78-4DF9-97F9-90DEFAE9A51C

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2011 World Chocolate Masters Press Release
Hello Eating China, I'm Gemma from SKIN Marketing China. 2011 World Chocolates Masters will be held in October this year in Paris. There're three participants in Asia who have won out and got the chance to the Finals. May I have your email address and I can send the details of this competition to you. We'd like to wonder whether you will get interest in posting this news on your blog. Huge thanks. Look forward to your reply. Gemma Zhao

Gemma
29 April 2011
GemmaZhao@gmail.com

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re: Donkey for the pot
Indeed, it seems that there is no donkey in Taiwan. Maybe I should find time to go to the mainland to taste something interesting such as the donkey sandwiches and other donkey dishes.

Kuei-Ti Lu
12 April 2011
ktravelfor@gmail.com

http://www.culturezest.org/home/users/detail?UserHexID=2C585A58-2C78-4DF9-97F9-90DEFAE9A51C

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re: Donkey for the pot
The donkey meat sandwich seems to be available generally in the north. This site http://www.modernleifeng.com/?p=657 mentions a specific chain of restaurants in Beijing selling them. In Taiwan? I have never even seen a donkey here, though I suppose donkey meat is possibly available at some Beifang style place, but I have never heard of it.

Stephen (eating china)
12 April 2011

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re: Donkey for the pot
I am not in China now. In which counties can I find donkey burgers? I am really interested in it. Is it possible to find them in Taiwan? The donkey burgers' pictures I found online looked interesting; the donkey meat is really redder than beef!

Kuei-Ti Lu
11 April 2011
ktravelfor@gmail.com

http://www.culturezest.org/home/users/detail?UserHexID=2C585A58-2C78-4DF9-97F9-90DEFAE9A51C

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re: Donkey for the pot
The photos of the donkey burger look great. What area are you in?

Stephen (eating china)
10 April 2011

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re: Donkey for the pot
It is interesting to hear that people eat donkey (in my area, it seems that no one does so). I am interested in how the donkey burger is. I talked with my families about this, and they felt shocked (not in a negative way). Still, it seems that donkeys' fates are still...

Kuei-Ti Lu
10 April 2011
ktravelfor@gmail.com

http://www.culturezest.org/home/users/detail?UserHexID=2C585A58-2C78-4DF9-97F9-90DEFAE9A51C

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Restaurants Brugge
Oh very sweet and tasty food I like this food I say thanks for the nice idea and instruction I love more than.

Restaurants Brugge
04 April 2011
nandlal.icu@gmail.com

http://www.pergolakaffee.com/

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re: having trouble with links
Sorry 'bout links. Thanks for letting me know. All fixed now. Hope you enjoy some of the recipes.

stephen (eating china)
04 April 2011

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re: Taiwan trains get dining upgrade
Hi Paul, They have good, pricier lunch boxes of the high speed rail too, but the trip between Taichung and Taipei goes so quickly, if you wait for the trolley girl to come around you may run out of time to eat the thing. Also on the HSR, in keeping with the 'high class' image, they don't ballyhoo their wares, and if you are not on the lookout the trolley can slip by unnoticed. On any train they tend run out sometimes at mealtimes. Last time I was on a TRA train at lunchtime, and really hungry, I waited 30 minutes for the trolley, then went looking, but they had already sold out!

stephen (eating china)
04 April 2011

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re: having trouble with links...
hi, i really like this site and you have some recipes that sound amazing, but i can't get to any of the individual recipe pages. every time i click on one, it tells me that the link is broken.

lady_jane
04 April 2011

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re: Taiwan trains get dining upgrade
I know that most of the routes lunch boxes are kind of lack luster. However I would have to say that the ones from Taitung are really quite good. I actually looked forward to them when I had to ride the train north out of Taitung City. (This holds true for 2008- 2010 anyway, hopefully I will do more analysis this summer)

Paul
04 April 2011
lpaulvoss@gmail.com

http://chichihehe.wordpress.com/

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re: Taiwan trains get dining upgrade
Hi Kuei-Ti Lu, I know what you mean, there is nothing like recommendations from locals when you can get it. When I see a 'as seen on TVBS,' or a clipping from a newspaper on the restaurant, it tends to have an effect on me that is opposite of what is intended.

stephen (eating china)
04 April 2011

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re: Taiwan trains get dining upgrade
Indeed, Stephen, many East Asians recommend a restaurant simply because of its fame. Therefore, when I want to taste some local food, I have to contact my relatives living there. By the way, if one is going to eat oyster omelette (and other food) in Taiwan, it is better not to eat in the largest restaurant. Usually, it is because the restaurants pay much money to the media that it becomes famous.

Kuei-Ti Lu
03 April 2011
ktravelfor@gmail.com

http://www.culturezest.org/home/users/detail?UserHexID=2C585A58-2C78-4DF9-97F9-90DEFAE9A51C

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re: Taiwan trains get dining upgrade
You are right of course, not all Taiwanese are swayed by fame or reputation. I was exaggerating to make a point, but fame or big brand names do seem to have a particular pull on not just Taiwanese, but east Asians in general. I don't know how many times some restaurant has been recommended to me excitedly as 'famous,' only find it is fairly ordinary. Of course there are places that really deserve their high reputation, but I have learned to apply a little bit scepticism.

stephen (eating china)
02 April 2011

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re: Taiwan trains get dining upgrade
Not every Taiwanese can not distinguish fame and quality, but it is usually those who live near a restaurant that can know its weaknesses. I agree that most of the times, the K brought instead of bought are the best. Still, it is interesting to see the Railways K becomes a little more innovative.

Kuei-Ti Lu
02 April 2011
lukueiti@gmail.com

http://www.culturezest.org/home/users/detail?UserHexID=2C585A58-2C78-4DF9-97F9-90DEFAE9A51C

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re: sponge tofu
Paris, sure other types of tofu soak, but I was talking about plain tofu, and that does not. You touch on another point, that Chinese never eat tofu on its own, which has probably lead to the common idea amongst many people that tofu is bland - it is bland, but not necessarily so when married with other ingredients. Even the simplest dish that I have tried - a cold tofu cake with soy sauce - was not that bland, and it any case, this was a side dish only, not the main course. Chinese, even when dining alone crave variety, and will almost always have more than one dish.

Stephen (eating china)
27 March 2011

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re: sponge tofu
There are too many kinds of tofu. Sponge tofu or frozen tofu sucks up the juices very nicely. Togan(dried tofu) also has a similar effect. As for smooth, plain, egg tofu, we tend to eat it not just by itself, but along with the soup, so the aroma of tofu (yes, good quality tofu is good) adds flavour to the soup. The rich beany flavour gives most soups or sauces a creamy flavour and it balance out other strong seasoning. You're not supposed to eat it separated from the sauce or soup.

Paris
27 March 2011
roxyboomboom@gmail.com

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re: Pucker up – eating vinegar
Thanks for the clarification Kuei-Ti Lu.

stephen (eating china)
26 March 2011

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re: Pucker up – eating vinegar
The use of 吃醋 can, as one kind of rhetoric, extend to any kind of jealousy, not only for a person in a relationship.

Kuei-Ti Lu
26 March 2011
ktravelfor@gmail.com

http://www.culturezest.org/home/users/detail?UserHexID=2C585A58-2C78-4DF9-97F9-90DEFAE9A51C

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re: Tofu
yes frozen tofu does soak up liquid and flavours. Plain tofu does not.

stephen (eating china)
19 March 2011

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re: Tofu
I agree that tofu does not act like a sponge, when I have hot pot, the flavour does not penetrate, perhaps, if you froze the tofu first, then cooked it in liquid. y

Koji
16 March 2011

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re: Chinese pickled cucumbers
Glad to hear it turn out well. You can try some other vegetables the same way.

stephen (eating china)
14 March 2011

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re: Soy & hot oil sauce
Giday Jel. I think you'd be OK with any kind of chillies, they'd just be more or less hot. The cayenne is fairly mild usually.

stephen (eating china)
14 March 2011

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re: Chinese pickled cucumbers
Turned out brilliantly, thanks. This is one of my fave side dishes when I eat out here in Taiwan, so it's handy to know how to make it at home :)

Kathryn
13 March 2011
kathmeista@gmail.com

http://kathmeista.blogspot.com

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re: Soy & hot oil sauce
Are cayenne chillis really used in this sauce? What other chillis could be used? The only fresh chillis at my local supermarket (woolworths) are medium sized long 'slightly bent cone' shaped red or green. Would they do? Thinking about that sauce makes my mouth water.

Jel
12 March 2011

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re: the tofu sponge question
Right Calista. They call that deep-fried tofu over here (Taiwan). It is spongy, and shrinks in on itself when it is removed from liquid.

stephen (eating china)
09 March 2011

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re:
It really depends on the type of tofu. The kind of tofu that really soaks up flavours like a sponge is fried tofu puffs. They look like... brown sponge.

Calista
09 March 2011

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Hakkamui
Sound Yummy though I will skip black pepper, coz it usually westernize the dish

hakkamui
07 March 2011
chankimhong@gmail.com

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re: no shame to be a foodie
You are right Ms Foodie, I am. I guess I just don't like being called one. You, obviously with a nickname like Ms Foodie, have no such problem. Cheers

stephen (eating china)
06 March 2011

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no shame to be a foodie
Hi Stephen, you have a blog named eatingchina.com and your twitter is chinafoodman, you talk about food, so yes, you are considered a foodie! LOL :) 加油!

Ms. Foodie ;)
06 March 2011

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re: tofu Type
Good point Puerjohn. Totally agree. There are some special kinds of tofu that can soak up liquid and flavours but ordinary soft tofu is not one of them. I have never heard of 'bee hive tofu' but I guess it is another name for frozen tofu, which in Taiwan they also call 千葉豆腐. thousand leaves tofu. That definitely does soak up flavours, and literally is a sponge.

stephen (eating china)
05 March 2011

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Love Chinese Food
I love Chinese. Tofu is my special favourite. Great feeling to go through your site.

Huck
03 March 2011
huckfinn1896@gmail.com

http://www.seoblighty.co.uk

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Type
I'm well aware of the claims that all tofu soak up the soup/flavors of the dish it is placed in; I've found this to rarely, if ever happen. However, there is one type of tofu, that I am aware of and am in love with, that does soak up the flavors of the dish (usually a soup). Roughly translated it is called, bee hive tofu. The tofu is very much like a sponge, so during the cooking process, if you give it a good squeeze, it'll absorb the soup it was cooked in. Regarding other tofus being able to absorb the flavors, perhaps if it was placed in some concoction for a week, I have yet to see it suck in the flavors all the way to the middle.

Puerjohn
02 March 2011

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Ants Climbing Trees
Fabulous! And don't be fooled by the 200gms noodles and 200 gms pork mince, I doubled it thinking it would not be enough...... I think we'll be eating it for the next week!!!! And, when you serve it the bits of pork run down the noodles and do so look like ants climbing back down a tree. Flavours are supurb, and so, so easy!

Jilly
01 March 2011
lilydalemayhem@bigpond.com

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Great trip!
Sounds like a fun trip you had. jellyfish is not bad at all. Crunch, but good

vietfoodrecipes
01 March 2011
caitlincool@yahoo.com

http://www.vietfoodrecipes.com

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How To Eat Chinese
Hey guys, you've got some awesome chinese food blog here! I really like your recipes and everything, way to go! Can I use some of your stuff on my chinese blog related to "how to eat chinese"? you can see it at http://howtoeatchinese.com Cheers!

How To Eat Chinese
28 February 2011
sverdlov@abv.bg

http://howtoeatchinese.com

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